Product Safety and Handling


Product Safety and Handling

It is important to check with national, state, provincial and local environmental regulatory authorities prior to disposing of any material designated as waste. In some cases, uncontaminated PPG powder coatings products are considered to be non-hazardous industrial waste. However, it is the obligation of the waste generator to properly characterize the waste and determine the regulations applicable for proper disposal. This is particularly important if powder coatings products have been mixed with other materials. The characterization includes determining the composition and character of the waste. The SDS is a source of information to identify hazardous ingredients in the powder coatings product. However, the presence of hazardous ingredients in the product does not necessarily mean the powder coatings product waste is a hazardous waste. In some cases the solubility of an ingredient and its ability to produce a leachate will impact whether a waste exceeds testing or regulatory levels. For example, barium sulfate is insoluble undermost conditions, and its presence does not necessarily make a product containing it a hazardous waste.
As stated previously, it is the obligation of the waste generator to understand the appropriate regulations and manage the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. To minimize dust generation during disposal, uncontaminated powder product can be melted and solidified. Most PPG powder coatings will melt between 150-200o F (65-95o C). However, be sure to review the potential environmental, health and safety measures that are appropriate for your operations, as well as any applicable regulatory requirements before melting the product.
 

The need to wear PPE should be determined based upon the conditions in your workplace and the potential for exposure. Some tasks, such as filling hoppers, manual transfer of powder coatings products, color changes and clean-up procedures (booth, equipment and spills) have the potential to generate airborne particulate. A PPE hazard assessment is needed to evaluate the potential exposures and hazards in the workplace. PPE that may be considered includes eye protection and a faceshield, non-insulating gloves, anti-static coveralls and anti-static shoes. The anti-static treatment will help reduce the potential for PPE to generate static electricity that could cause sparks or explosions. Faceshields should be worn over other eye protection when needed for additional face protection, but not instead of safety glasses or goggles. Respiratory protection may also be needed during operations where potential particulate exposures cannot be controlled by other methods.
 
The need for respiratory protection should be part of the workplace PPE hazard assessment conducted at your facility. The potential for airborne exposure to powder particulate during various tasks such as material transfers and clean-up needs to be considered. Depending upon the airborne exposure in your workplace and the effectiveness of workplace controls, respiratory protection may or may not be necessary. In some cases, an air purifying respirator may be needed, and in others, powered air or supplied air respiratory protection may be appropriate.
 

You can find shelf life information in the downloadable Product Data Sheet located on each of the specific product pages.

You can find VOC information in the PDS located on every product page. If you have a more specific question, please Contact Us.

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